During their commutes, New Jersey drivers may find themselves stuck behind a slow driver in the left-hand freeway lane. It bears repeating that slow drivers can be dangerous not just because they impede traffic but also because they can cause other drivers to become unsafe and tailgate or angrily pass them by.

Drivers need to remain patient when faced with a slow driver. They can start by waiting a minute to see if the driver will get out of the way. If the driver does not, then the next thing to do is to flash the lights to get that person’s attention. If this fails, then honking (not obnoxiously) will most likely do the trick.

It’s good to keep in mind the four types of motorists who tend to go slow. The first are distracted drivers, especially those who use their phones. Cell phones, according to the National Safety Council, lower parietal lobe activity by just over a third. This is the area of the brain that’s most involved in driving.

Then there are the sightseers and newly licensed drivers, both of whom may be unfamiliar with certain routes and drive slow as a precaution. New drivers tend to lack confidence, too. Lastly, there are seniors with health problems. Arthritis, for example, can reduce their pressure on the accelerator.

Those who have been injured in a crash with a slow driver may find themselves held partially at fault if they were tailgating or made a sudden move out of impatience. If they suffered serious injuries, though, and their degree of fault is less than 50%, they may be able to pursue a personal injury case. A lawyer could assess the case for them. If hired, legal counsel could handle the settlement negotiations and much more.