Of the injuries that you could suffer, some of the worst are those to your eyes. When you can’t see or are left waiting to find out if your sight will return, it’s a frustrating situation.

Eye injuries are relatively common in car accidents, though they’re not talked about as often as some other kinds of injuries. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) states that crashes are among the leading causes of eye injuries in the U.S. each year. Around 9,200 eye injuries happen annually as a result of collisions.

Can you recover from eye injuries?

When you suffer an eye injury, it may or may not affect your sight. If it does affect your sight, the vision loss may be temporary or permanent, depending on the cause.

For example, a corneal abrasion damages the dome-shaped area at the front of the eye. An abrasion here causes discomfort and pain, but most are treated easily and will heal.

More serious is a detached retina. The injury may not cause pain, but a torn retina can cause impaired peripheral vision, light flashes in the line of sight, blurred vision or other issues. Detachment can lead to permanent vision loss without rapid treatment.

Another common eye injury in crashes is the orbital fracture. This is a fracture of the bone that surrounds the eye socket. While small fractures may not be problematic, serious fractures could require surgery to help your eye function normally in the socket.

Eye injuries are serious, so if you suffer one in an auto accident, seek help as soon as possible. Your attorney will also help you file a claim for compensation to cover your medical needs and other losses.