Estate planning frequently involves making arrangements to address the distribution of an individual’s personal assets among his or her heirs when he or she passes away in New Jersey. Such planning might also include actions that occur while the grantor is alive. Also, estate planning is not limited to dealing with personal assets. Business owners may make decisions regarding their companies as well.

A will allows a person to direct who receives the business upon his or her passing. Without a will, a state’s intestate laws guide the transfer of ownership. If a spouse gets the company, the result could prove disastrous if he or she was not previously involved. How can someone run a business without any knowledge of the industry? Even selling the company could prove problematic as the inexperienced spouse might not know how to value it. Perhaps the will might endow ownership to someone else but give the spouse minority ownership and the resulting revenues. A will could specify the directives a person wants to be carried out.

Many aspects of estate planning apply to business matters. Power of attorney documents may give someone else total control over the business and financial decisions, which, in some cases, might be beneficial. Of course, choosing an honest and business-savvy person makes the most sense.

A living will, or health care proxy, also provides care-oriented directions if someone becomes incapacitated. Many people don’t like considering the possibility of health disasters occurring, such as going into a coma or losing brain function. However, these terrible medical scenarios do occur.

A succession plan reflects a vital business-oriented document. The document may name someone to run a business when the owner becomes incapacitated or passes away. As with other aspects of estate planning, someone might wish to carefully think things through when writing a succession plan.

Estate planning may benefit business owners. Effective planning could even take burdens off their heirs’ shoulders.